National industrialization is not passé!

02 May 2013

By Giovanni Tapang, Ph.D.

It is disheartening to hear from the Presidential spokesperson, Edwin Lacierda, …that “national industrialization is passe.” He issued this statement as he announced the termination of the government’s negotiations with the National Democratic Front. It now appears that government policy, as reflected by its stance on the peace negotiations, no longer considers building our domestic industrial economy an important goal for this administration.

Read on…

8 Responses to National industrialization is not passé!

  1. May 2, 2013 at 8:11 pm
    jojie

    Since lacierda is a lawyer and not an economist, he probably does not know the reason why China has converted from a central state planning to a Capitalist economy via the massive nationalist industrialization. The Philippines is a free-wheeling capitalist state but never had the benefits of a nationalist industrialization because of church aversion to communism and scare tactics of Western-bred technocrats who are brain-washed with American economic models.

  2. May 2, 2013 at 8:15 pm
    manuel buencamino

    From what I understand, national industrialization, in the context of Jomao’s ideology, means state-owned industries. I don’t think Lacierda is against industrialization per se, just against the state putting up and owning industries. That is what I think he meant by national industrialization is passé.

    • May 3, 2013 at 10:02 am
      jojie

      if putting up pockets of private industries where you will compete against international advance economies, there is no way the Philippines can attain full industrialization. Since the beginning of World War II we have allowed foreign-owned industries to exploit our natural resources without transferring their technology and benefits to the national patrimony of our country. We have strategic national resources like mining,coconut,sugar, rice and plenty of wood sufficient to supply our local and international market. I have seen other economies like Saudi Arabia where they have used petrol dollar to buy an independent and progressive industrialization. How stupid therefore our govt in allowing strategic industries in the hands of private and foreign dominated industries to pocket their profits at the expense of the national good.

      • May 3, 2013 at 11:41 am
        GabbyD

        “How stupid therefore our govt in allowing strategic industries in the hands of private and foreign dominated industries”

        wow jojie, so, if its government controlled industries (btw, name of government controlled industry that isnt fossil fuels) it is GOOD.

        but in the other post, sabi mo, ang daming corrupt sa gobyerno, such that the NPA has the right/duty to use violence against government and whoever supports the government.

        ano ba tlga? for you, the government is PERFECT when its convenient for your argument. can you figure it out first, whether govt involvement is good or bad?

        ano ba tlga?

  3. May 2, 2013 at 8:19 pm
    manuel buencamino
  4. May 3, 2013 at 12:59 am

    “Middle-income trap” by Michael Tan http://opinion.inquirer.net/51867/middle-income-trap

    • May 3, 2013 at 2:57 am
      GabbyD

      now, this is a much more interesting column. ang problema lang, tan never does explain what experts believe causes the middle income trap. that would have been a cool column.

  5. May 3, 2013 at 2:55 am
    GabbyD

    tapang: “It now appears that government policy, as reflected by its stance on the peace negotiations, no longer considers building our domestic industrial economy an important goal for this administration.”

    huh? ang labo.

    i love how the peace negotiations means that the government doesnt want industrialization.

    take note: he NEVER EXPLAINS the connection between the two. he just runs with it… (because there is no connection)

    hay buhay…

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